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In addition, there is no EU-wide database on private agreements between EU companies and third countries. Although the vessels covered by these agreements flying the EU flag or operated by EU nationals, the EU has not established procedures to ensure that these agreements comply with EU fisheries legislation, comply with labour law or guarantee to the EU operator that the authorisation they have obtained is valid. Information on private agreements since 2008 has been included in the access to information request. However, the European Commission has not been able to provide information on eu Member States` fishing activities under private agreements. Private agreements are therefore not included in this database. Access for third-country vessels to EU waters, for example in overseas territories, is governed by access agreements with the EU. Currently, Venezuelan-flagged vessels fish in French Guiana and Seychelles-flagged vessels in Mayotte. These agreements are extremely important for a large part of the EU fleet, in particular the agreement with Norway, which includes quotas worth more than €2 billion. These concern the joint management of common stocks with Norway, Iceland and the Faroe Islands. EU vessels fish in Norwegian, Icelandic and Faroese waters under FAR licence and vice versa. As many stocks in the North Sea and North-East Atlantic are shared across maritime borders, the EU, Iceland, Norway and the Faroe Islands coordinate their fishing activities and exchange quotas.

These agreements are extremely important for a large part of the EU fleet, in particular the agreement with Norway, which includes quotas worth more than €2 billion. In the North-East Atlantic, fisheries stakeholders and adjacent coastal States cooperate in the management of large stocks under neAFC. Each year, separate meetings of coastal States are scheduled to define TACs and management measures. They concern the stocks of goldfish, blue whiting, Atlanto-Scandinavian herring, mackerel and rockall haddock. All management measures agreed in this framework are transmitted to NEAFC. The agreement with Norway is the largest fisheries agreement in northern Europe. It is based on a fisheries agreement concluded in 1980 and supplemented by an exchange of letters in 1992. This Agreement shall be managed through annual consultations between the two Parties. Annual consultations traditionally focus on two main themes: the setting of TACs for jointly managed common stocks in the North Sea (including cod, plaice and haddock) and the exchange of fishing opportunities. The FAR issues fishing authorisations for different types of access outside EU waters and for third-country vessels wishing to fish in EU waters.

The main types of permits are as follows. So many of the affected shares are managed jointly and allowances are traded to ensure that they are not wasted. Some of these stocks are managed by the Intergovernmental Agreement on Fisheries for the North-East Atlantic, established for the management of fish stocks in the region, while others are managed by agreements between coastal states. . . .